Kidney Paired Donation Video Education Trial Save

Date Added
April 25th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00075387
Researcher
Derek Dubay

Silhouette
Keywords
Education, Kidney, Transplant
Summary

Live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) offers the most optimal survival and quality
of life benefit for those with late-stage chronic kidney disease. However, one-third of potential donors who volunteer to undergo evaluation on behalf of an intended recipient are blood-type or cross-match incompatibility. Kidney paired donation (KPD) was developed as a strategy to provide these incompatible donor-recipient pairs with an innovative opportunity for LDKT, yet its uptake by potential donors and their intended LDKT recipients is not optimal. In this study, we will evaluate the
effectiveness of a targeted video intervention designed to address common concerns
about KPD on the knowledge of KPD risks and benefits, KPD self-efficacy, and KPD
concerns in incompatible potential donors and their intended recipients.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Thomas Morinelli
843-792-5405
morinelt@musc.edu

Community Talking Circles: Qualitative Research to Document Patient Needs Save

Date Added
November 30th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068865
Researcher
Philip Smeltzer
Keywords
Education, Environmental Factors, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Language, Minorities, Non-interventional, Writing
Summary

Focus groups or talking circles are formed in community neighborhoods to facilitate input on common patient experiences. Insights on patient perceptions related to physician office visits and after visit self care are obtained in groups of 8-12 participants.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Philip Smeltzer
843-792-6637
smeltzerp@musc.edu

Pilot study of mobile app monitoring to prevent heat-related symptoms among Hispanic farmworkers Save

Date Added
September 20th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00069288
Researcher
John Luque
Keywords
Education, Environmental Factors, Healthy Volunteer Studies
Summary

The proposed research will test and evaluate a Spanish-language, heat-related
illness (HRI) prevention, OSHA mobile application (app) intervention (Heat Safety Tool) in South Carolina, with the long-term goal of reducing HRI among migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Caroline Davila
843-876-2248
davilac@musc.edu

Translating an Evidence-based Urban Asthma Program for Rural Adolescents: Testing Its Effectiveness & Cost-effectiveness and Understanding Implementation Factors Save

Date Added
August 1st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00069047
Researcher
Phillippe Cunningham

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Asthma, Education
Summary

Asthma has high morbidity and mortality among adolescents and among youth from rural communities, both of whom are seldom included in asthma intervention research. This study will test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of high school-based intervention delivered by Community Health Workers (CHWs) to rural adolescents with uncontrolled asthma, and will examine factors associated with delivery of the intervention.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Phillippe Cunningham
843-876-1800
cunninpb@musc.edu

Impact of a Nursing Practice-Focused Educational Program/Experience on Extent of Clinical Nurses' Engagement in Essential Professional Nursing Practices. Save

Date Added
July 18th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00067721
Researcher
Christine Miller
Keywords
Education
Summary

Three different groups of subjects will be participating in this study: student nurses in their last semester; Nurse Managers on in-patient units in hospitals; and Nurse Educators in hospitals. Approximately two-three months following completion of the PPC (or after employment as a CN in a hospital for student nurses), the EPNP instrument will be administered to participants on-line. Completed questionnaires will be returned directly to the HSRA office.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Christine Miller
803-434-7475
christine.miller@palmettohealth.org

Feasibility of Simulation to Teach High-Alert Medication Safety Save

Date Added
June 16th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00063761
Researcher
Laura Sessions
Keywords
Education
Summary

Initially, interview data will be obtained from registered nurses form St Agnes HealthCare and Baltimore Washington Medical Center to inform the development of two high-alert medication administration (HAM) simulation scenarios, one for education, and one for evaluation of safety performance. After development and cognitive pretesting of the simulation scenarios by RNs, nursing students will receive both HAM simulation scenarios. Students will complete two instruments, one on the quality of the simulation design and one on the quality of the simulation debriefing. Focus groups will be conducted to assess nursing student perceptions of the learning scenarios along with the specific design elements, qualitatively. The findings of the focus group will inform revisions to the simulation scenarios. We will evaluate the potential for implementing the nursing simulations for medication administration at Howard Community College analyzing feasibility factors such as student participation, and of resources (technological and personnel).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Laura Sessions
443.980.5262
sessionl@musc.edu

Gendered Racial Factors in Girls' Self-Regulation, Drug, and Behavior Disparities Save

Date Added
November 1st, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060638
Researcher
Colleen Hallidayboykins

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Education, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health, Minorities, Substance Use, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to understand factors contributing to managing emotions, behavior problems, and substance use risk among girls. Middle school adolescent girls will be asked about their thoughts and feelings about themselves and their ethnic group, perceptions, and discrimination. They will also report on their behavior and substance use risk. Their reactions to recent incidents of unfair treatment or disciplinary action will also be assessed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jennifer Powell
843-876-0567
smithjl@musc.edu

URCC 14040: A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effectiveness of Yoga, Survivorship Health Education, and Cognitive Behavioral therapy for Treating Insomnia in Cancer Survivors Save

Date Added
March 15th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00053106
Researcher
Jeffrey Giguere
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Brain, Cancer/Breast, Cancer/Gastrointestinal, Cancer/Genitourinary, Cancer/Gynecological, Cancer/Head & Neck, Cancer/Leukemia, Cancer/Lung, Cancer/Lymphoma, Cancer/Myeloma, Cancer/Other, Cancer/Sarcoma, Cancer/Skin, Education, Exercise, Sleep Disorders
Summary

This research study is for patients who have completed all scheduled surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for their cancer within the last 6-12 months and are currently having some type of sleep disturbance. While there is no standard treatment for sleep disturbance for cancer survivors, people who do not take part in this study may take over-the-counter or prescription medications, receive cognitive behavioral therapy, or exercise as a means of attempting to manage their sleep problems.

Sleep disturbance, particularly insomnia, is a common problem for cancer survivors. Insomnia can be described as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking up earlier than you would like. Insomnia can increase fatigue, impair physical function, impair immune function, cause circadian rhythms (known as your biological clock) to be disrupted and decrease quality of life.

Because there is no ideal standard of care for effectively treating sleep problems in cancer survivors, the purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of three different treatments for improving sleep problems and determine which is best. The three treatments are yoga, survivorship health education, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-I).

Study participation will be approximately 8 months.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Gina Norris
864-242-2762
gnorris@ghs.org

Gendered Racial Factors in Girls' Self-Regulation, Drug, and Behavior Disparities Save

Date Added
February 2nd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00051830
Researcher
Colleen Hallidayboykins

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Education, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health, Minorities, Substance Use, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to understand factors contributing to managing emotions, behavior problems, and substance use among girls. Middle school adolescent girls will be asked about their thoughts and feelings about themselves and their ethnic group, perceptions, and discrimination. They will also report on their behavior and substance use. Their reactions to recent incidents of unfair treatment or disciplinary action will also be assessed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jennifer Powell
843-876-0567
smithjl@musc.edu

A Geriatric Assessment Intervention for Patients Aged 70 and Over Receiving Chemotherapy or Similar Agents for Cancer: Reducing Toxicity in Older Patients Save

Date Added
January 21st, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00041289
Researcher
James Bearden
Keywords
Aging, Cancer, Education, Non-interventional
Summary

A majority of patients diagnosed with cancer are over age 65, yet most cancer treatments are developed in a younger population. Older cancer patients are more likely to experience side effects. There is no standard way to treat chemotherapy side effects in older patients. A Geriatric Assessment (GA) can be used to predict who is at risk for side effects but there is no standard way to decrease this risk. Also, there is not agreement on how information from a GA can be used to develop ways to prevent or treat side effects.

The purpose of this study is to find out if the GA can help improve and develop a standard approach for reducing and/or preventing chemotherapy side effects in older cancer patients. The GA is intended to determine an older patient's level of independence taking into account health conditions, physical performance (walking, leg strength, and balance), nutrition, social support and memory. Several tests as well as questionnaires are used. The combined results establish what is called a patient's functional age, which may be quite different from the actual age. Functional age can help better predict a patient's tolerance of and likely response to cancer treatments as well as provide other important age-related information not routinely captured by cancer doctors. If you decide to participate in this study, you will receive the GA.

Institution
Spartanburg
Recruitment Contact
Clinical Research Department
1-800-486-5941
SurvivorshipProgram@gibbscc.org

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