Trials and ReseArch NetworkS FOR More South Carolina (TRANSFORM SC) Child Health Recruitment Registry Save

Date Added
June 9th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00063569
Researcher
Andrew Atz

Silhouette
Keywords
Asthma, Autism, Children's Health, Diabetes, Obesity
Summary

The TRANSFORM network is focused on improving child health outcomes in SC through research on conditions of highest priority for future generations. These include conditions like asthma, autism, diabetes, obesity and early childhood outcomes. To accelerate research study recruitment activities for future projects that TRANSFORM sites may participate in, the TRANSFORM network sites will create a research recruitment registry of families interested in volunteering for research. Participants will enter their own as well as their child(ren)'s information into the electronic registry which can be used to identify people to contact for future studies.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Samantha Renaud
803-576-5913
renaud2@mailbox.sc.edu

Dyslipidemia of Obesity Intervention Trial DO IT! Save

Date Added
June 6th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00037680
Researcher
Andrew Atz

Silhouette
Keywords
Children's Health, Obesity
Summary

This trial of pitavastatin will determine efficacy and safety in this high risk population, and provide evidence for clinicians to target this treatable risk factor to achieve an impact on early atherosclerosis, and potentially achieve primary prevention of adult cardiovascular disease.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Layla Al Sarraf
843-792-1213
alsarraf@musc.edu

Developmental Impact of NICU Exposures (DINE) UG3 Study Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program Save

Date Added
May 2nd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00065251
Researcher
Carol Wagner

Silhouette
Keywords
Children's Health, Infant
Summary

This study is a longitudinal, observational follow-up of MUSC subjects previously enrolled in the NIH funded Tolsurf study. It is being conducted to determine the developmental impact of NICU exposures to chemical plasticizers called phthalates that are found in the NICU environment. Subjects who participated in the Tolsurf study are part of a larger group of NIH funded studies. Participants in each of these NIH funded NICU studies have urine samples from their NICU stay stored in a biobank. These urine samples will be tested for phthalates. If the families agree to let their children participate in the study, results of pulmonary testing and developmental testing will be compared to levels of phthalates in the urine collected during their NICU stay. Previous studies have linked phthalates in-utero to developmental delays, asthma, and altered onset of puberty. The aims of the DINE study are to identify the sources of phthalates in the NICU and measure the impact of phthalates in the NICU.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lynn Smith
(843)324-8442
smithlt@musc.edu

Exposome Contributors to Child Health Originating from National Fetal Growth Study (ECCHO-NFGS) Save

Date Added
March 9th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00058961
Researcher
John Vena

Silhouette
Keywords
Children's Health, Obesity
Summary

The proposed study (ECCHO-NFGS) provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand mechanisms of in utero exposures on risk of childhood outcomes of public health significance. The data are of the highest quality, are the most detailed serial assessments of fetal development available in any cohort. We will demonstrate our ability to engage children and standardize our research protocols to address our hypotheses (UG3) and follow this cohort prospectively for future risk assessment (UH3). The NFGS is the ideal cohort to assess the prenatal determinants of two key health outcomes ? obesity and neuroimpairment as well as be a resource for the ECHO Consortium for all four outcome focus areas.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
JacKetta Cobbs
843-792-0172
echo-nfgs@musc.edu

Pathogen Identification in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients with Suspected Lower Respiratory Tract Infection Save

Date Added
December 6th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060294
Researcher
Michelle Hudspeth

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Immune System, Lung, Pediatrics, Transplant
Summary

This study is for patient that have been diagnosed with suspected lower respiratory tract infection. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new test that may be able to find more lung infections than current tests can. This new test is called next-generation sequencing and looks in respiratory secretions for bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other organisms that may cause infection. We hope to learn more about the usefulness of this new test in identifying infections.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Thomas Hortman
864-792-9579
hortman@musc.edu

Gendered Racial Factors in Girls' Self-Regulation, Drug, and Behavior Disparities Save

Date Added
November 1st, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060638
Researcher
Colleen Hallidayboykins

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Education, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health, Minorities, Substance Use, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to understand factors contributing to managing emotions, behavior problems, and substance use risk among girls. Middle school adolescent girls will be asked about their thoughts and feelings about themselves and their ethnic group, perceptions, and discrimination. They will also report on their behavior and substance use risk. Their reactions to recent incidents of unfair treatment or disciplinary action will also be assessed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jennifer Powell
843-876-0567
smithjl@musc.edu

South Carolina Sickle Cell Disease Access to Care Pilot Program (SC) Save

Date Added
July 19th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054236
Researcher
Julie Kanter washko

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Blood Disorders, Children's Health, Infant
Summary

The purpose of this research protocol is to collect information about individuals living with sickle cell disease to help improve the care of those patients. We hope to understand more about the disease itself, the best ways to treat the disease, and the best ways to help patients with sickle cell disease get care. The goal is to have clinical information about every person diagnosed with sickle cell disease in South Carolina so that we can better treat the disease and help develop new ways to improve outcomes.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katherine Williams-Turner
843-876-0821
willkat@musc.edu

Single Ventricle Reconstruction III: Brain Connectome and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes Save

Date Added
July 14th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056838
Researcher
Andrew Atz

Silhouette
Keywords
Children's Health
Summary

We will combine state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques in 140 Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial (SVR) III patients and 100 control subjects with innovative brain connectome or "graph" analyses to determine if brain connectivity graph measurements will provide novel neuroimaging biomarkers for neurodevelopmental disabilities and improve our understanding of their inciting mechanisms in the SVR survivors. Only 6 of the SVR III patients and no controls will be enrolled at MUSC.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Tecklenburg
843-792-1213
tecklenb@musc.edu

National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative (NPC-QIC) - A Collaborative Initiative to Improve Care of Children with Complex Congenital Heart Disease Save

Date Added
June 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056522
Researcher
Frances Woodard
Keywords
Cardiovascular, Children's Health, Heart, Infant, Non-interventional
Summary

Transforming health care and outcomes for children with rare diseases is difficult within the current health care system. There is great variation in care delivery, inadequate and slow application of existing evidence, and ineffective use of available data to generate new knowledge. Individual care centers have inadequate numbers of patients for robust learning and improvement. In order to redesign the system, changes must take place at multiple levels, including the patient and family, clinician, practice and the network. The purpose of this project is to design, develop, and test further refinements to an improvement and research network focused on HLHS, the most severe congenital heart defect, and to use a registry to simultaneously improve clinical care, redesign care delivery systems and to conduct quality improvement, health services, outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research. The purpose of this initiative, specifically, is to improve care and outcomes for infants with HLHS by: 1) expanding the established NPC-QIC national registry to gather clinical care process, outcome, and developmental data on infants with HLHS between diagnosis and 12 months of age, 2) improving implementation of consensus standards, tested by teams, into everyday practice across pediatric cardiology centers, and 3) engaging parents as partners in improving care and outcomes. We utilize a quality improvement methodology, known as the adapted learning collaborative model, which expedites the implementation of tools and strategies that facilitate changes such as systematic care coordination, cardiovascular monitoring, and nutritional monitoring into every day practice. The NPC-QIC registry is used to document the impact of these changes on various care processes and outcomes (e.g., mortality rate, readmissions, and weight gain).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Frances Woodard
843-792-3292
klinefl@musc.edu

Translating the Asthma Medication Ratio into a Point of Care Risk Assessment and Communication Tool Save

Date Added
June 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054731
Researcher
Anne Lintzenich

Silhouette
Keywords
Asthma, Children's Health
Summary

This study will consist of hour long focus groups or interviews with parents or legal guardians of children with asthma. The goal of this research is to determine barriers and challenges that parents face regarding daily asthma medication adherence. We also seek to identify success stories of parents who have been able to achieve high levels of medication adherence in their children and what factors might have facilitated this success. We will use the results of this study for the future development of an intervention that uses individual patient medication history to assess and communicate risk to providers and families in order to improve asthma medication adherence and reduce preventable Emergency Department visits and Hospitalizations.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Erin Dawley
843-792-2542
hintone@musc.edu

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